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guitarbains:

yes adventure time. explain colonialism and racial imperialism to children and high niggas.

(Source: sandandglass, via onlylolgifs)

toparkornottopark:

An email I received from Mike Rice earlier this year regarding the game Set:
Hi Nikki,
Switching to my keyboard now for some better explanation. The wider lines thing is something I learned while playing the card game Set. Unfortunately, Set uses red, green, and blue colors for various symbols. Sometimes the symbols are solid, sometimes hatched, and sometimes just an outline. (See here: http://www.setgame.com/sites/default/files/styles/uc_product_full/public/SET-layout.png?itok=ESmUSnZ5) What I found was that I could easily distinguish between the solid shapes, but not so easily between those that were only an outline. The ones with hatching were somewhat in between the two - better than an outline, but not as good as solid. What I’ve found is that having a larger contiguous sample of the color improves my ability to see it. Playing in bright lighting improved the situation for me, but dim lighting, glare off the cards, and angles far from perpendicular made it worse. 
Given that your online samples are scaled down, the hatching on the actual signs is probably wider than it appears in the samples, and would be better for my perception. My thought was that having wider hatching (even if the white/red stripes are still equal widths) gives me a better chance of seeing red.
HTH,Mike

Remember the Color-Blind

toparkornottopark:

An email I received from Mike Rice earlier this year regarding the game Set:

Hi Nikki,

Switching to my keyboard now for some better explanation. The wider lines thing is something I learned while playing the card game Set. Unfortunately, Set uses red, green, and blue colors for various symbols. Sometimes the symbols are solid, sometimes hatched, and sometimes just an outline. (See here: http://www.setgame.com/sites/default/files/styles/uc_product_full/public/SET-layout.png?itok=ESmUSnZ5) What I found was that I could easily distinguish between the solid shapes, but not so easily between those that were only an outline. The ones with hatching were somewhat in between the two - better than an outline, but not as good as solid. What I’ve found is that having a larger contiguous sample of the color improves my ability to see it. Playing in bright lighting improved the situation for me, but dim lighting, glare off the cards, and angles far from perpendicular made it worse. 

Given that your online samples are scaled down, the hatching on the actual signs is probably wider than it appears in the samples, and would be better for my perception. My thought was that having wider hatching (even if the white/red stripes are still equal widths) gives me a better chance of seeing red.

HTH,
Mike

Remember the Color-Blind

rhamphotheca:

Watch John Oliver Explain Why “It’s Your Fault You’re Not Rich” Is Bullshit

by Hannah Levintova

On Sunday’s Last Week Tonight, host and comedian John Oliver ripped into American politicians’ colossal mishandling of the US wealth gap, which continues to grow to ever more astronomical proportions. As Oliver points out, plenty of lawmakers insist the game isn’t rigged against the poor — ahem, Marco Rubio — while others recognize the problem but are too afraid to be gung-ho on the issue because of, well, politics.

(via: Mother Jones)

There Is Some Hope That We Aren't Living Inside a Computer Simulation

I think my brain just broke.

(Source: rhamphotheca)

I believe this sums up my feelings quite nicely.

I believe this sums up my feelings quite nicely.

(Source: cockbarf, via theremina)

type-lover: 3 jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin

(via anothervisionuk)

free-parking:

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.

"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”

(via raleighdrift)

prettyclever:

wats

Now with circles and guidelines!

fromonesurvivortoanother:

dynastylnoire:

strugglingtobeheard:

note-a-bear:

kyssthis16:

micdotcom:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg hates Supreme Court mansplaining as much as you 

Follow micdotcom

I felt this on a spiritual level.

curiousgeorgiana

my grandpa went to high school with her. and i love these photos!

The last shot though.

Dear Diary,

Today men were terrible again.

Ruth

(via youandsometimeswhy)

scienceisbeauty:

This is a classic `nude calendar´ when you extract everything which transparent to X-Rays, i.e. all the flesh, and therefore any remaining sensuality.

Via The Mary Sue: “This Exists: X-Ray Pin-up Calendar

I imagine this is how Superman see’s people. X-ray vision is more than just seeing through clothes [;

betype:

Typography by Salina Y.

Love that first piece, the numbers are supa dupa fresh!

guitarbains:

yes adventure time. explain colonialism and racial imperialism to children and high niggas.

(Source: sandandglass, via onlylolgifs)

type-lover:

Pine Trees
by Cyla Costa

toparkornottopark:

An email I received from Mike Rice earlier this year regarding the game Set:
Hi Nikki,
Switching to my keyboard now for some better explanation. The wider lines thing is something I learned while playing the card game Set. Unfortunately, Set uses red, green, and blue colors for various symbols. Sometimes the symbols are solid, sometimes hatched, and sometimes just an outline. (See here: http://www.setgame.com/sites/default/files/styles/uc_product_full/public/SET-layout.png?itok=ESmUSnZ5) What I found was that I could easily distinguish between the solid shapes, but not so easily between those that were only an outline. The ones with hatching were somewhat in between the two - better than an outline, but not as good as solid. What I’ve found is that having a larger contiguous sample of the color improves my ability to see it. Playing in bright lighting improved the situation for me, but dim lighting, glare off the cards, and angles far from perpendicular made it worse. 
Given that your online samples are scaled down, the hatching on the actual signs is probably wider than it appears in the samples, and would be better for my perception. My thought was that having wider hatching (even if the white/red stripes are still equal widths) gives me a better chance of seeing red.
HTH,Mike

Remember the Color-Blind

toparkornottopark:

An email I received from Mike Rice earlier this year regarding the game Set:

Hi Nikki,

Switching to my keyboard now for some better explanation. The wider lines thing is something I learned while playing the card game Set. Unfortunately, Set uses red, green, and blue colors for various symbols. Sometimes the symbols are solid, sometimes hatched, and sometimes just an outline. (See here: http://www.setgame.com/sites/default/files/styles/uc_product_full/public/SET-layout.png?itok=ESmUSnZ5) What I found was that I could easily distinguish between the solid shapes, but not so easily between those that were only an outline. The ones with hatching were somewhat in between the two - better than an outline, but not as good as solid. What I’ve found is that having a larger contiguous sample of the color improves my ability to see it. Playing in bright lighting improved the situation for me, but dim lighting, glare off the cards, and angles far from perpendicular made it worse. 

Given that your online samples are scaled down, the hatching on the actual signs is probably wider than it appears in the samples, and would be better for my perception. My thought was that having wider hatching (even if the white/red stripes are still equal widths) gives me a better chance of seeing red.

HTH,
Mike

Remember the Color-Blind

rhamphotheca:

Watch John Oliver Explain Why “It’s Your Fault You’re Not Rich” Is Bullshit

by Hannah Levintova

On Sunday’s Last Week Tonight, host and comedian John Oliver ripped into American politicians’ colossal mishandling of the US wealth gap, which continues to grow to ever more astronomical proportions. As Oliver points out, plenty of lawmakers insist the game isn’t rigged against the poor — ahem, Marco Rubio — while others recognize the problem but are too afraid to be gung-ho on the issue because of, well, politics.

(via: Mother Jones)

There Is Some Hope That We Aren't Living Inside a Computer Simulation

I think my brain just broke.

(Source: rhamphotheca)

I believe this sums up my feelings quite nicely.

I believe this sums up my feelings quite nicely.

(Source: cockbarf, via theremina)

type-lover: 3 jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin

(via anothervisionuk)

free-parking:

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.

"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”

(via raleighdrift)

prettyclever:

wats

Now with circles and guidelines!

fromonesurvivortoanother:

dynastylnoire:

strugglingtobeheard:

note-a-bear:

kyssthis16:

micdotcom:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg hates Supreme Court mansplaining as much as you 

Follow micdotcom

I felt this on a spiritual level.

curiousgeorgiana

my grandpa went to high school with her. and i love these photos!

The last shot though.

Dear Diary,

Today men were terrible again.

Ruth

(via youandsometimeswhy)

scienceisbeauty:

This is a classic `nude calendar´ when you extract everything which transparent to X-Rays, i.e. all the flesh, and therefore any remaining sensuality.

Via The Mary Sue: “This Exists: X-Ray Pin-up Calendar

I imagine this is how Superman see’s people. X-ray vision is more than just seeing through clothes [;

betype:

Typography by Salina Y.

Love that first piece, the numbers are supa dupa fresh!

About:

i am a designer, typographer, printer, image maker, thinker, ranter, walker, gawker, snowboarder, cycler, and kravist. i've lived in seattle, los angeles, and san francisco. i like lemon, ginger, and honey. this is my island for my misfit ideas.

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