/page/2

unamusedsloth:

Comic strip artists from the 40’s draw their characters while blindfolded

❤️ genius.

(Source: unamusedsloth, via theremina)

windwolf0097:

dirtylittledamsel:

this is more dramatic than a Lana Del Rey music video



uhhhhh… wat?

windwolf0097:

dirtylittledamsel:

this is more dramatic than a Lana Del Rey music video

uhhhhh… wat?

(via dutchster)

the-awesomologist:

adreciclarte:

THE MAKING OF “IN VOLUPTAS MORS” – SALVADOR DALI BY PHILIPPE HALSMAN

(Source: una-lady-italiana, via naked-yogi)

tehawesomeness:

nathaliaarcher:

This Abandoned Traffic Jam Has Been Sitting Here For 70 Years And It’s Stunning. (x)

Right in the middle of a small forest near Chatillon, a little village in Southern Belgium, is a graveyard of abandoned and beautiful rusty cars. These cars once belonged to US soldiers who were stationed in this region. It’s not known how they managed to acquire these beauties in the middle of the war. When World War II ended, all military troops were sent back to the US, but the cost of having all those cars shipped was way too expensive. The ranking officers decided to leave all the cars in Belgium. The cars were driven up a hill, one by one, nicely parked and somehow hidden from the outside world.

Once back home in the US, the soldiers who wanted to retrieve their car had to take personal responsibility for all costs of the shipping. Not a single car was retrieved.

At one point there were four car graveyards around Chatillon, and as many as 500 vehicles. Only one remain today. Over time, corrosion and decay have worn down the vehicles and what little remained were stolen by the locals and car collectors.

Whoa, this is creepy.

thekidshouldseethis:

This Rube Goldberg machine is “powered” by a single beam of light, using mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflective surfaces to burn through strings, melt ice, pop balloons, and more… 
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

This Rube Goldberg machine is “powered” by a single beam of light, using mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflective surfaces to burn through strings, melt ice, pop balloons, and more… 

Watch the video.

wlkcalli:

Old one #wlk #calligraphy #tattoo #letter #chill #krakow #katowice #kaligrafia #typography #goodtype #thedailytype #g #rnicrew

God this is gorgeous

wlkcalli:

Old one #wlk #calligraphy #tattoo #letter #chill #krakow #katowice #kaligrafia #typography #goodtype #thedailytype #g #rnicrew

God this is gorgeous

(via fuckyeahcalligraphy)

type-lover:

MICHEL DERRE’S LAYERS FOR THE ALGO TYPEFACE
BY MICHEL DERRE


MORE HERE!

Oh dear god this is hot…

typeworship:

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

typeworship:

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

thekidshouldseethis:

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, wind-powered sculptures that walk on the beach.
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, wind-powered sculptures that walk on the beach.

Watch the video.

type-lover:

Beats In Space
by Luca Fontana

A gorgeous poster set from Luca Fontana

inspiringpieces:

Face Canvas

Makeup Artist Laura Jenkinson definitely has a passion for comics. In a new instagram photo series, she takes advantage of her make-up skills to combine the best of both worlds. As a result she has recreated some of her favorite cartoon characters on her mouth by using just her own face as canvas. Isn’t it amazing how well the characters fit into her face? 😹

Which of Laura Jenkinson’s artworks is your favorite?

Leave a comment

[via]

MORE I Follow us: Inspiring Pieces

(Source: inspiringpieces, via kravfit)

unamusedsloth:

Comic strip artists from the 40’s draw their characters while blindfolded

❤️ genius.

(Source: unamusedsloth, via theremina)

windwolf0097:

dirtylittledamsel:

this is more dramatic than a Lana Del Rey music video



uhhhhh… wat?

windwolf0097:

dirtylittledamsel:

this is more dramatic than a Lana Del Rey music video

uhhhhh… wat?

(via dutchster)

the-awesomologist:

adreciclarte:

THE MAKING OF “IN VOLUPTAS MORS” – SALVADOR DALI BY PHILIPPE HALSMAN

(Source: una-lady-italiana, via naked-yogi)

tehawesomeness:

nathaliaarcher:

This Abandoned Traffic Jam Has Been Sitting Here For 70 Years And It’s Stunning. (x)

Right in the middle of a small forest near Chatillon, a little village in Southern Belgium, is a graveyard of abandoned and beautiful rusty cars. These cars once belonged to US soldiers who were stationed in this region. It’s not known how they managed to acquire these beauties in the middle of the war. When World War II ended, all military troops were sent back to the US, but the cost of having all those cars shipped was way too expensive. The ranking officers decided to leave all the cars in Belgium. The cars were driven up a hill, one by one, nicely parked and somehow hidden from the outside world.

Once back home in the US, the soldiers who wanted to retrieve their car had to take personal responsibility for all costs of the shipping. Not a single car was retrieved.

At one point there were four car graveyards around Chatillon, and as many as 500 vehicles. Only one remain today. Over time, corrosion and decay have worn down the vehicles and what little remained were stolen by the locals and car collectors.

Whoa, this is creepy.

thekidshouldseethis:

This Rube Goldberg machine is “powered” by a single beam of light, using mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflective surfaces to burn through strings, melt ice, pop balloons, and more… 
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

This Rube Goldberg machine is “powered” by a single beam of light, using mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflective surfaces to burn through strings, melt ice, pop balloons, and more… 

Watch the video.

wlkcalli:

Old one #wlk #calligraphy #tattoo #letter #chill #krakow #katowice #kaligrafia #typography #goodtype #thedailytype #g #rnicrew

God this is gorgeous

wlkcalli:

Old one #wlk #calligraphy #tattoo #letter #chill #krakow #katowice #kaligrafia #typography #goodtype #thedailytype #g #rnicrew

God this is gorgeous

(via fuckyeahcalligraphy)

type-lover:

MICHEL DERRE’S LAYERS FOR THE ALGO TYPEFACE
BY MICHEL DERRE


MORE HERE!

Oh dear god this is hot…

typeworship:

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

typeworship:

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

thekidshouldseethis:

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, wind-powered sculptures that walk on the beach.
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, wind-powered sculptures that walk on the beach.

Watch the video.

type-lover:

Beats In Space
by Luca Fontana

A gorgeous poster set from Luca Fontana

inspiringpieces:

Face Canvas

Makeup Artist Laura Jenkinson definitely has a passion for comics. In a new instagram photo series, she takes advantage of her make-up skills to combine the best of both worlds. As a result she has recreated some of her favorite cartoon characters on her mouth by using just her own face as canvas. Isn’t it amazing how well the characters fit into her face? 😹

Which of Laura Jenkinson’s artworks is your favorite?

Leave a comment

[via]

MORE I Follow us: Inspiring Pieces

(Source: inspiringpieces, via kravfit)

About:

i am a designer, typographer, printer, image maker, thinker, ranter, walker, gawker, snowboarder, cycler, and kravist. i've lived in seattle, los angeles, and san francisco. i like lemon, ginger, and honey. this is my island for my misfit ideas.

Following: